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Table of Contents

Introduction

Purpose of Collection Development Plan

The Collection Development Plan serves as a guide for the selection and retention of materials for the San Francisco Public Library system. The Plan is designed to support the Library’s Mission Statement.

The Community and the Library

The City of San Francisco prides itself on providing a welcoming and inclusive environment for all people. The Library has a long history of championing intellectual freedom and strives to provide services and collections which meet the needs of its users and the general citizenry.

Through the extensive resources of the Main Library, the twenty-seven branches which serve the neighborhoods of San Francisco and a virtual library of e-resources, the San Francisco Public Library serves residents of San Francisco, the Bay Area and beyond. Through the online catalog, the extended resources of academic and public libraries throughout California are available to augment the collections.

San Francisco is comprised of multiple discrete and diverse neighborhoods. In order to meet the needs of a changing population, library collection development managers consider such factors as neighborhood and city wide demographics, as well as projected changes for given neighborhoods.

The Library acknowledges the important role of the community in collection development by inviting suggestions for purchase, monitoring requests, and evaluating the collections on an ongoing basis.

Principles

San Francisco Public Library Mission Statement

The San Francisco Public Library system is dedicated to free and equal access to information, knowledge, independent learning and the joys of reading for our diverse community.

Collection Development Policy

The Collection Development Policy supports the mission of the San Francisco Public Library and provides direction and guidance for the Collection Development Plan. It is the goal of the Library to provide a high quality collection of books and other materials in a variety of formats and languages for all ages that is responsive to the needs and interests of the community and reflective of the diversity of the community. To support an informed public, the collections shall represent diverse points of view, and may include materials that some members of the public consider to be controversial in nature. The Library will provide free and equitable access to library collections to all users. In selecting materials, library staff will use professional reference resources, judgment, knowledge and experience to select these materials, and will proactively solicit advice from, as well as anticipate the needs and interests of, the community. Within budgetary and space limitations, the collections will serve to enhance the cultural, literary, aesthetic and educational pursuits of library users and the needs of the community as a whole.

The San Francisco Public Library endorses the principles documented in the American Library Association:

Adopted by the Library Commission 4-3-08

Collections

Main Library Collections & Centers

Introduction

The San Francisco Public Library is a primary source of information, knowledge and learning for those who live and work in San Francisco. The Library’s collections respond to the community’s needs and reflect its diversity.  They enhance the cultural, literary, aesthetic and educational pursuits of its users. 

The Main Library collects material in many media and formats, including print (books, magazines, newspapers, photographs, scores and sheet music, prints, engraving, archival documents and other ephemera), microform (microfilm and microfiche) audio-visual (films, sound recordings, video recordings) and digital formats (online databases, e-resources, scanned documents).  These resources range from the most popular to research-level primary source material.  In addition to having the core fiction and nonfiction materials for the entire library system, the Main Library has also significant resources that are unique and of continuing interest to the community.

The collections represent the ethnic and cultural diversity and meet the educational levels of the people of this large metropolitan area, including users served regionally by the Link+ network and nationally through Inter-Library Loan.  The Main Library offers current titles and best-sellers, materials that provide general coverage and understanding of a subject, as well as supporting higher-level secondary source material.

The Main Library also has in-depth, non-circulating subject collections in several defined areas: San Francisco history; gay and lesbian interest; book arts; sheet music; and government documents. These collections include current, retrospective and primary resource coverage. In order to make these materials more widely available and to preserve them, the Library continues to digitize text and images from these collections.

The Main Library is a Federal depository library, responsible for providing free access to information produced by all three branches of the United States government; this responsibility influences the retention of materials. To support and assist other City & County of San Francisco agencies and the public, the Library retains all documents produced by the City & County of San Francisco.

The following descriptions of collections and centers explain in greater detail the Main Library’s subject areas, as well as the community served.

Information Services and TIP

Information Services and TIP (Telephone Information Program) collections consist of

  • Fiction and Browsing Collection
  • Audiovisual Center 

Fiction and Browsing Collection

International in scope, the collection provides the Library’s largest concentration and widest diversity of fiction and fiction-related titles in English. A solid historical collection is retained and replenished and current works are acquired on an ongoing basis. Users of these collections include students of all levels, writers, practitioners, performers and inquisitive readers.

This collection comprises a general fiction collection with separate browsing collections of significant genres and the graphic-novel format. Short stories by a single author and short-story anthologies have been integrated into general fiction or the appropriate genre. 

The collection includes world classics, standard works, best sellers, prize winners, literary and popular fiction; new authors, local authors and international authors in English translation all are acquired to support the literature studies of students, as well as the joy of reading.  Significant author’s works are actively acquired and retained.  This is a support collection that is weeded based on significance of title and changing use.

Genre Fiction: Mysteries, romances, science fiction, urban fiction and westerns; emphasis on popular works; (See the General Collections department for the J. Francis McComas Science Fiction Collection.)

Graphic Novels: Book-length novels whose narrative is related through a combination of text and art in comic-strip form from a variety of genres including superheroes, alternative comics and manga.

Audiovisual Center

Most Audiovisual material at the San Francisco Public Library floats throughout the Library system based on patron borrowing.  The Louis R. Lurie Foundation Audiovisual Center houses the Main’s largest collection of circulating media including videos on DVD and Blu-Ray, music on CD, language learning on CD, and audiobooks in several languages on CD. The collection includes feature films in several languages; select television series; and nonfiction documentaries. New acquisition of videos is in DVD & Blu-Ray as the Library strives to adopt evolving technologies. Audiobook formats are evolving as well; downloadable titles and ebooks are also purchased.  This is a basic collection and is weeded continuously based on use.

Videos: The feature films, documentaries and television shows in the video collection provide entertainment and support lifelong learning. Nonfiction videos emphasize travel, opera, dance, film history, musical performances, cookery, fitness, 20th century history and documentaries on social issues. The Library also has an extensive collection of international films.  A large assortment of classic and contemporary television shows are collected.

Audiobooks: Audiobooks provide entertainment and uphold the Library’s mission of supporting lifelong learning. Titles are of current and classic fiction and nonfiction, as well as college-level lectures.

Music: Music from all times and places includes a wide range of styles and genres – world music, rock, jazz, classical and opera.

Language learning: Instruction is offered for those learning languages other than English. Emphasis is on Spanish, French, Chinese and other European and Asian languages.

Access Services Center

The Access Services Center encompasses the following collections and locations:

  • Deaf Services Center
  • Library for the Blind & Print Disabled
  • Large Print

Deaf Services Center

The Deaf Services Center provides information to all who are interested in general and specialized information – including biographiesabout hearing loss, deafness, Deaf culture, American Sign Language, prominent individuals and other associated topics. Materials in the collection are intended to appeal to D/deaf and hard-of-hearing adults, children, teens, their family members and friends, as well as to professionals in related fields. Children and teens use age-appropriate books and videos in DVD and VHS formats. Researchers, professionals and students use specialized conference proceedings, serials and vertical file material. Archival-level materials are actively sought from local and national agencies, organizations and individuals. This is a comprehensive collection and weeding rarely occurs.

  • American Sign Language: Introduction to and practice in ASL; Deaf history, culture, education and performance as it relates to ASL.
  • American Sign Language Interpreting: Initial process; preparation for certification and continuing education units awarded by the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf.
  • Culture: Hard-of-hearing, late-deafened, oral deaf, D/deaf, Deaf-Blind; primarily in the United States, some foreign cultures represented.
  • Education: History of Deaf education; current U.S. educational resources for infancy through high school.
  • Fiction: Works featuring D/deaf, oral deaf, late-deafened and hard-of-hearing characters; works by deaf authors.
  • History: From the 1800s to the present.
  • Language Acquisition: From birth to age 12.
  • Reading Development: From preschool to age 12.

Library for the Blind & Print Disabled

The Library for the Blind & Print Disabled (LBPD) serves San Francisco residents whose disabilities qualify them for the Library of Congress’ National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS). San Francisco Public Library is a sub-regional library of the NLS and houses a current, general interest collection of their Talking Books. LBPD also offers descriptive videos in limited quantities, based primarily on availability. All descriptive videos are retained, as are the four most recent years of the NLS’ collection of Talking Books. General information on blindness and on disabilities that prevent individuals from reading standard print is available in the General Collections & Humanities Center and the Business, Science & Technology Center.

Descriptive Videos: Popular movies and television programs with additional narration that fills in non-verbal actions, costumes, gestures and scene changes.

Periodicals: Popular titles in audio format; titles in audio format addressing blindness, low vision and issues related to the disability community.

Reference: Information about local services for people in the blind, low vision and print-disabled communities.

Talking Books: All of the 2,000 or so titles recorded annually by the NLS; current, popular and classic fiction and nonfiction titles; predominantly in English (plus 35 or so Spanish language titles recorded each year); geared to adults, young adults and juveniles as young as pre-kindergarten.

Large Print

This collection serves readers with vision impairments as well as those who are learning English as a Second Language, adult new readers and people with reading and learning disabilities. The collection is comprised of books printed in a 16- or 18-point modified-serif font. The collection aims to satisfy those interests through bestselling fiction (with an emphasis on mysteries, romance, science fiction and westerns) and nonfiction (with an emphasis on biographies, health, politics, history, cooking, travel, inspirational and motivational information). This is a basic collection that is weeded continuously based on use.

Children’s Center

The Fisher Children’s Center is the largest, most comprehensive children’s collection in the library system. The collection is intended for children from birth through middle school age, as well as adults interested in children’s literature. It contains nonfiction titles in all subjects and includes a deep juvenile fiction section which retains classic authors and titles from previous centuries as well as current popular titles. The juvenile picture story collection is extensive and contains many titles of multicultural interest. The juvenile beginning reader section is large and contains the best titles produced for children practicing their reading skills. The folklore collection is deep and built with the intention of representing as many world cultures as possible; it contains many historic titles that are no longer in print. The magazine collection includes a selection of the best periodicals of both general and special interest for a variety of ages and reading levels. The board book, graphic novel, music and movie collections contain popular interest titles and do not focus on historic completeness. The collection of reference books is intended to complement and add depth to the extensive collection of circulating nonfiction titles, as well as to support the professional development of children’s librarians. Titles in more than 50 languages are included in the collection, representing the most common languages spoken in the city as well as those spoken by smaller cultural groups in the Bay Area.

Priority is given to books of current interest to children. The Fisher Children’s Center also serves as a repository for last copies of fiction and nonfiction titles held by the system that have ongoing relevance. Books in languages other than English are purchased from abroad as well as domestically; the size of each collection often depends on the Library’s ability to find or establish a working relationship with international and U.S. vendors.

The collection is used by children, parents, teachers, budding and experienced children’s authors and illustrators, library school graduate students, students of children’s literature, preschool

teachers, English as a Second Language learners (adults and children), adults learning a new language, adults studying for early childhood accreditation, and children’s literature researchers. This is a resource collection that is weeded based on significance of title, usage and maintenance of existing collection strengths.

The Children’s Center houses the following special collections as well:

  • Early Childhood: Current titles on parenting; early childhood education; issues surrounding children from the ages of birth to eight years.
  • Effie Lee Morris Historical and Research Collection of Children’s Literature: Titles in many subjects relating to children’s literature. Included in the Effie Lee Morris Collection are the following collection concentrations:
  • Changing Portrayals Collection (picture books, fiction, and non-fiction): Books presenting ethnic stereotypes (negative or positive).
  • San Francisco Collection (picture books, fiction, and non-fiction): Books by local and Northern California authors and illustrators, and books that portray the history and culture of San Francisco and Northern California.
  • American Library Association  and Association of Library Service to Children Awards: Copies of the Newbery, Caldecott, Batchelder, Sibert, Coretta Scott King and Printz Award winners; some honor books.
  • Alice in Wonderland Collection: Fiction and non-fiction titles relating to Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, including many illustrated editions of Alice; titles are in English with some in languages other than English; Alice-related realia.
  • Beatrix Potter Collection: Most available books by and about Beatrix Potter, including editions in languages other than English; books based on Miss Potter’s books; related realia.

The Mix at Main (Teen Center)

The Mix at Main Teen Center offers titles that meet the popular interests of teenagers. The collection of books (including graphic novels) and magazines focuses on recreational reading for ages thirteen to eighteen. Paperback copies are the most popular format for all materials. (For curricular and academic needs, teenage patrons may rely on the adult nonfiction and fiction collections, as well as on juvenile nonfiction collections.) Teen materials are offered in English, Spanish and Chinese, the most commonly-spoken languages among teens in San Francisco. Materials for the Teen Center are selected from professional review sources, San Francisco Public Library teen librarian reviews and teen patron suggestions.  Because of the ephemeral nature of teen popular interests, this is a basic collection that is weeded continuously based on use.

General Collections and Humanities Center

The General Collections and Humanities Center encompasses the following collections and locations:

  • Generalities
  • Philosophy / Religion
  • Social Sciences
  • Languages
  • Literature
  • History / Geography
  • Biography
  • African American Center
  • International Center
  • Chinese Center
  • Filipino American Center
  • Gay & Lesbian Center

Generalities

These are general works not limited to any one specific discipline, e.g. almanacs, encyclopedias, bibliographies, lists of trivia, uncommon knowledge, directories of organizations, guides to the methodology of writing and publishing and scholarship in general. This collection also includes titles on the practice of journalism, library science and the organization of knowledge, plus works about paranormal phenomena, legendary mysteries, UFOs and other possible deceptions, hoaxes, errors, delusions and superstitions. Users range from those wanting brief, encyclopedic accounts of various topics to those who intend to do serious research. This is a support collection that is weeded based on significance of title and changing use.

Philosophy / Religion

This collection explores inquiry into humankind’s systems of knowledge, belief and wisdom.  It supports the intellectually and spiritually curious, and the specific needs of students from high school through college, with a wide range of reference works, bibliographies and secondary works. This is a support collection that is weeded based on significance of title and changing use.

  • Philosophy / Ethics: Ancient, medieval and eastern philosophies; contemporary western philosophy; metaphysics and logic; supports both the research needs of undergraduate students and the philosophical and ethical interests of the lay reader.
  • Occult: Popular and esoteric sources dealing primarily with alchemy, astrology, extrasensory perception, feng shui, dream interpretation, magic, the paranormal.
  • Psychological Theory: Introduction to the field of psychoanalysis with works of Jung, Freud and their successors; research, methodology and other disciplines including developmental, cognitive, comparative and social psychologies.
  • Popular Psychology / Self-Help: Ever-expanding and very popular subject area includes books responding to a variety of interests, including self-esteem, self-improvement and interpersonal communication.
  • Biblical Studies: Numerous translations of the Bible; interpretive texts such as concordances, topical Bibles, bible dictionaries, bible encyclopedias and exegesis of specific biblical books; selected variant New Testament texts such as the Nag Hammadi discoveries and other Gnostic gospels; studies of the historical Jesus which reflect local interest in early Christian history.
  • Christianity: Historic works treating evolving Christian developments, denominations and doctrines complemented by the works of modern and contemporary Christian thinkers and theologians.
  • Islam: Translations and interpretations of the Qur’an; historical and sociological studies of the rise, spread and diversification of Islam.
  • Judaism: Various translations of the Torah and Talmud; the entire Tanakh; guides to Jewish history, ritual, discourse and mystical traditions such as the Kabbalah.
  • Buddhism: Historical texts in translation and a wide selection of the teachings of local and international contemporary teachers reflecting local interest in, especially, Zen and Tibetan Buddhism.
  • Polytheism and Emerging Spiritualities: Works on long-standing and contemporary polytheisms – from Hinduism to Santeria, Rasta to Wicca, Native American religions to Neo-Paganism – reflecting local interest in alternative spiritual outlooks.

Social Sciences

Here are interdisciplinary works on human society, sociology, social anthropology, social class, social problems and group behavior. Some of the collection supports and overlaps with the Gay and Lesbian Center, the African American Center, the Chinese Center, the Filipino American Center and the Japanese Interest collections. Materials are usually purchased with a general audience and the beginning student in mind, although works in the Educational Guidance Collection are aimed at the college-bound student. This is a support collection that is weeded based on significance of title and changing use.

Social Interaction & Social Groups: Principles of sociology, interpersonal relations and social psychology within and between groups; in-depth analyses of specific groups by sex, class, religion, ethnicity, etc.; problems, roles, class and social status issues and discrimination against specific groups, historically and currently.

  • Social Processes: Various means of socialization and social control.
  • Factors Affecting Social Behavior: Ecological anthropology (e.g. geographic, chronological, climatic, biological, other environmental factors affecting humans) and demographic characteristics (births, deaths, population control efforts affecting societies).
  • Culture and Institutions: Culture defined as the aggregate of a society’s beliefs, folkways, mores, scientific and technological influences, including the patterns of behavior that comprise unique social institutions.
  • Communities: Kinds, their planning and development, the movement of people to, from and within communities and their overall structure.
  • Emigration and Immigration: Historical and current coverage of the movements of groups and individuals from one country to another.
  • Slavery and Emancipation: Slavery’s history, aftermath and consequences; long-term effects on society.
  • General Statistics: Pertaining to general facts about continents, countries and localities in the modern world.

Social Problems and Services: Historical and current materials on social problems, social welfare and the specific kinds of services and organizations developed to meet societal needs; health, public safety, housing problems, environmental concerns and the institutions developed to deal with them; accounts of true crimes, stories of real criminals, causes of crime and delinquency and historical and contemporary accounts of law enforcement and penal institutions; historical and contemporary accounts of various benevolent and fraternal organizations, their rituals and their work for social improvement.

  • Education: Current, in-depth coverage of pedagogy, the needs of students of all ages – including adults – and the administration of educational institutions; study guides and practice test books for college admission or placement.
  • Customs, Etiquette and Folklore: Those of specific economic, social, occupational, ethnic and religious groups; prescriptive and practical works on social behavior in general and specific events (e.g. weddings) in particular.
  • Disabilities: Psychological and social aspects of living with disabilities; historical aspects of blindness, vision impairment, deafness and hearing impairment; guides for those living with blindness; instructional materials for the teaching of sign language; instructional materials for those with learning disabilities and those who support them, including classroom materials, parental support guides and a multimedia collection; guides for those supporting people with disabilities.

Languages

Basic materials such as dictionaries, encyclopedias, selected editions of important works, handbooks and periodical publications in different languages are collected. Instructional language materials are offered with an emphasis on Spanish, French, Chinese and other European and Asian languages. The collection reflects changes in population patterns, community needs and patron demand and is aimed at students, travelers and those interested in expanding or acquiring a new language skill. (Fiction and nonfiction works in international languages are collected by the International Center, which serves the recreational and basic information needs of native speakers, the general public and of those learning English and other languages. Films, documentaries, audiobooks and other non-print material in international languages are collected by the Audiovisual Center.).  This is a basic collection that is weeded continuously based on use.

  • English Language / Linguistics: Beginning-to-college-level materials for those learning the English language; general and specialized dictionaries; material discussing the origins of language and the alphabet.
  • ESL: English-language and bilingual materials to help non-native speakers learn English as a Second Language; materials for instructors of ESL. We collect materials in print, audio and video formats.
  • International Language Learning: Emphasis is on the needs of English-speaking adult and student beginners and travelers.

Literature

Works of fiction are part of the Fiction and Browsing Collection in Information Services and TIP.  Literature here refers to essays, literary criticism, plays and poetry.  This collection is international in scope and reflects a wide diversity of literature and literature related titles in English.  The collection of modern and contemporary American poetry is particularly in-depth, serving as a resource for the local poetry community. Users of these collections include students of all levels, writers, practitioners, performers and inquisitive readers. This is a support collection that is weeded based on significance of title and changing use.

  • American and British Literature: Literary theory, literary criticism, multi-genre anthologies, humorous essays, poetry and plays; modern and contemporary American poetry; plays, including current and upcoming local productions; writing manuals for fiction and nonfiction.
  • Germanic Literature in Translation: Poetry, drama, essays, speeches, letters, humor, satire, literary criticism and miscellaneous works from the Germanic family of languages; emphasis on works that appeal to the casual reader and beginning student.
  • French Literature in Translation: Primarily plays ranging from the 17th century to the modern period; Surrealist and absurdist writings, especially drama and poetry.
  • Italian Literature in Translation: Translations and bilingual editions of works written in verse during the Middle Ages; plays and poetry from more recent eras.
  • Spanish and Portuguese Literature in Translation: Modern and classical Spanish and Latin American poetry, drama and miscellaneous writings in translation or in bilingual form; literary history and criticism of authors and literary works of the respective regions; emphasis on contemporary works by prominent Latin American and Spanish authors.
  • Classical Greek and Latin Literature in Translation: Ancient Greek and Latin philosophy, histories, poetry, plays, rhetoric, fiction and letters in myriad translations; complete set of the Loeb classics provides text in the original language side by side with English translations.
  • Literature Composed in Non-Roman Alphabets in Translation: Literary genres and criticism of works originally written in languages native to the Celts, Middle Eastern, Near Eastern and Far Eastern regions, Africa, former Soviet republics and Warsaw Pact nations and pre-colonial languages of the Americas; ancient Sanskrit epics, 19th century to contemporary Russian plays and poetry, and classical Chinese and Japanese poetry.
  • J. Francis McComas Science Fiction collection: a reference collection of more than 3,000 science fiction books and magazines from the 1920s to 1970s.

History / Geography

With an emphasis on United States, this collection supports the interests of students of history, amateur genealogists, travelers, veterans and the adult and young adult reader. Very little genealogical primary source material is offered; rather, the emphasis is on putting how-to materials in researchers’ hands. This is a support collection that is weeded based on significance of title and changing use.

  • Ancient History: Surveys; popular works of particular countries and empires; emphasis on ancient Egypt, China, Rome, Greece, Mesopotamia and Palestine; retrospective and contemporaneous accounts by ancient historians.
  • Asian History: Emphasis on China, Japan, the Philippines and the countries of the Middle East; materials on past and present wars involving the United States; Israel-Palestine conflict.
  • European History: Emphasis on World War II, current conflicts and social conditions affected by historical movements.
  • Genealogy / Family History: Histories of prominent families; how-to materials for amateur researchers.
  • Geography and Travel: Personal narratives; guidebooks reflecting a variety of travel styles, interests and budgets; emphasis on San Francisco, California and the West; atlases, country, state and city maps.
  • Military / Naval / Warfare History: Battles, weaponry and strategy; United States Army, Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps histories; international military powers past and present; terminology, uniforms, medals and insignia.
  • North and Central American History: United States and its territories, Canada, Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean; native peoples of and immigrants to North America; emphasis on San Francisco, the Bay Area, California and the West; Revolutionary War, Civil War and other wars and conflicts fought on American soil.
  • South American History: Modern and pre-Columbian; emphasis on current developments and changes; aspects of social conditions influenced by historical events.

Biography

This collection highlights the lives, careers and accomplishments of those of the past as well as the present, including notable women, gays, lesbians, bisexuals, transgenders, people with disabilities, Native Americans and people of African, Asian and Latino/Hispanic heritage, in a true reflection of the diversity found in San Francisco. Users of the collection include the general public and students from the high school through undergraduate levels searching for references to particular people or interested in the history of science and technology. This is a resource collection that is weeded based on significance of title, usage and maintaining existing collection strengths.

  • Collective Biography: Current and retrospective biographies of notables associated with the United States and, to a lesser extent, other countries; emphasis is on a diverse and inclusive collection; see Art, Music & Recreation Center for collective biography of artists, musicians and sports figures; see Business, Science & Technology Center for collective biography of scientists and businesspeople; see Government Information Center for collective biography of political figures.
  • Individual Biography: Historical and contemporary biographies covering famous or infamous individuals in every field of endeavor (the exception being that biographies of performing and visual artists are found in the Art, Music & Recreation Center); memoirs of great literary merit or local interest; collected letters and journals; autobiography and biography.

African American Center

The selected titles in the African American Center’s reference collection act as a gateway to the Library’s overall collection; it is the tip of the iceberg of the Library’s holdings related to African Americans and the African American experience. Some of the Center’s materials are unique within the Library, but many titles – both reference and circulating – are also accessible elsewhere in the system.

These general and reference-level materials meet the needs of the casual browser, college student and researcher. Emphasis is on the history, traditions and culture of Americans of African descent and of the African Diaspora worldwide. This is a resource collection that is weeded based on significance of title, usage and maintaining existing collection strengths.

International Center

The Kresge Foundation International Center provides fiction and nonfiction titles (including best sellers, popular materials and current general works) in languages other than English which cover a variety of subjects. Special emphasis is placed on providing materials in languages spoken by the larger communities in San Francisco – Spanish, Chinese, Russian and Vietnamese – as well as on more than three dozen other languages with significant demand which reflect local skills and interests. The collection serves the recreational and basic information needs of native speakers, the general public and those learning English and other languages.  This a basic collection that is weeded based on use.

Chinese Center

The selected titles in the Chinese Center’s reference collection act as a gateway to the Library’s overall collection; it is the tip of the iceberg of the Library’s Chinese and English language holdings related to China, Chinese culture and the Chinese in America. This is a support collection that is weeded based on significance of title and changing use.

Filipino American Center

The selected titles in the Filipino American Center’s collection act as a gateway to the Library’s overall collection; it is the tip of the iceberg of the Library’s holdings related to Filipino Americans and the Filipino American experience. Some of the Center’s materials are unique within the Library, but many titles – both reference and circulating – are also accessible elsewhere in the system.  The Center contains material in English, Filipino and other dialects. Filipino fiction, literature and history are a significant part of the collection. This is a support collection that is weeded based on significance of title and changing use.

Gay & Lesbian Center

The James C. Hormel Gay and Lesbian Center, named for the local philanthropist and supporter, collects, preserves and provides access to materials on all aspects of the culture, history and life experience of members of the LGBTQIA community. The community includes Lesbians, Gay Men, Bisexuals, Transgender, Queer, Questioning, Intersex people and their Allies. The selected titles in the Center’s reference collection act as a gateway to the Library’s overall collection; it is the tip of the iceberg of the Library’s holdings related to LGBTQIA community and experience. Some of the Center’s materials are unique within the Library, but many titles – both reference and circulating – are also accessible elsewhere in the system.

The LGBTQIA collection covers a broad range of subjects, including nonfiction (civil rights; gender identity; gender studies and Queer theory; arts; health; etc.), biography, and poetry. The Center pays particular attention to the experience of people of color, the disabled, youth, the elderly, and other groups which are often marginalized within this community. The collection, national and international in scope with a primary focus on Northern California, is intended for anyone seeking information about the LGBTQIA experience. Materials for the general San Francisco Public Library adult, teen and children’s collections are selected by the staff as appropriate. The Eureka Valley/Harvey Milk Memorial Branch also maintains a large circulating collection of LGBTQIA popular materials. The LGBTQIA collection is primarily in English; materials in international languages represent work that is important to present in its original language or that has not been translated into English. General works on LGBTQIA topics in international languages may also be found in the International Center.

The Center collects books, periodicals and serials, directories, manuscripts, photographs, films, video, LPs (long-playing records), cassette and compact disc recordings of music and the spoken word. The Center collects unpublished materials such as personal papers, organizational records and other important documents chronicling the history of the LGBTQIA community in Northern California. The Center also collects archival ephemera such as matchbooks, buttons, T-shirts, posters, bar cards trophies and flyers. Among the reference collections are historically-significant pulp paperback fiction of the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s; films archives of The Frameline San Francisco International LGBT Film Festival and other film collections; and the records of lesbian publishers; the Marriage Equality Movement and many more. Many of these archival materials are housed in the San Francisco History Center to facilitate public access and research use. Additionally, selected collections of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Historical Society are housed in the San Francisco History Center to facilitate public access and research use.

This is a resource collection that is weeded based on significance of title, usage and maintaining existing collection strengths.

Business, Science & Technology Center

The Business, Science & Technology Center encompasses the following collections and locations:

  • Mathematics / Sciences
  • Technology / Household Management / Consumer/ Cookery
  • Medicine/ Health
  • Engineering
  • Business / Economics
  • Jobs & Careers Center
  • Small Business Center

Mathematics / Sciences

Mathematics and the hard sciences – also called pure sciences – are fields built on quantifiable data, accuracy and objectivity. Library materials about mathematics serve the popular information needs of students, business people and trade apprentices. Library materials about the sciences and scientists serve those interested in increasing their personal knowledge as well as students at the high school through college levels. Textbooks typically are not collected. This is a support collection that is weeded based on significance of title and changing use.

  • Natural Sciences: General works including philosophy of science; fact books; science quizzes and questions; dictionaries; encyclopedias; science projects; general science education; nature writings; regional history.
  • Mathematics: Study guides and practice exams from basic arithmetic through advanced concepts, suited to high school through lower level college students.
  • Astronomy and Allied Sciences: General works including astronomy, gravity, astronomical theory, telescopes and astronomical observation; theories on the formation of the cosmos, planets, asteroids, celestial objects and phenomena; eclipses; comets; earth (as an astronomical object); ephemerides (nautical almanacs); works on time, timekeeping and calendars.
  • Physics: Lectures, study guides, dictionaries, encyclopedias, science projects, theories; works on thermodynamics, theories on sound, quantum mechanics, electricity and electronics, magnetism, lasers and optics.
  • Chemistry and Allied Sciences: Analytical and organic chemistry; crystallography, mineralogy, polymer science and technology, dictionaries, handbooks, encyclopedias, histories and theories; works on Nobel laureates and women in chemistry; study guides.
  • Earth Sciences: Volcanoes, earthquakes, mountains and deserts, landforms, caves, marine science and geology, weather, rocks, forests, gemology, geology of planets, geology in various parts of the world; dictionaries and encyclopedias on earth sciences and geology, climate and weather; atlases.
  • Paleontology and Paleozoology: Evolution vs. creationism; dinosaurs; animals; fossils; prehistoric life in America and other regions of the world.
  • Life Sciences and Biology: Biology; physiology; biochemistry; genetics; evolution; ecology; plant systems and parts; microbiology;  natural history and naturalists; microorganisms; wildlife in the United States and other countries; taxidermy; writings and biographies of Charles Darwin; encyclopedias on evolution, extraterrestrial subjects and microbiology.
  • Botany: Plant life, history, anatomy and physiology, pathology, edible and medicinal, mycology, poisonous plants, cultivated & native plants (e.g., wildflowers); coverage is worldwide with emphasis on descriptive works such as field guides and identification manuals on trees, shrubs, and flowers – especially those with a local or California focus.
  • Zoology: Bacteria; zoos and zoological illustrations; animal identification, physiology and behavior; animals in various regions of the world; aquarium fish (freshwater, tropical); fish identification; fish of the United States and various regions of the world; aquariums and care of; aquatic life, sharks, shells, corals and lobsters; works about entomologists; insect, amphibian and reptile guides; lizards; snakes; birds; mammals; dictionaries and encyclopedias.

Technology / Household Management / Consumer/ Cookery

The materials in this collection cover a broad spectrum of science-based topics that apply to daily life. The primary focus of the technology collection is on up-to-date handbooks and technical guides that satisfy the popular information needs of students, apprentices, hobbyists, home buyers, do-it-yourselfers, entrepreneurs and general readers. The current handbooks and manuals in the computer collection are used by students, hobbyists, owners of small businesses and general readers interested in specific software programs; this collection is meant to meet their popular information needs. Users of the cookery collection span all ages and abilities: home cooks; high school, college and culinary school students; food club members; authors; bakery, café and restaurant owners; chefs, bakers, cooks, professional caterers and food designers; small business owners. The household management collection serves the general public, including parents, culinary and cosmetology students, and amateur sewers. The gardening and agriculture collection provides an introductory overview for a general audience and lower-level college students, with selected important works. These are support collections that are weeded based on significance of title and changing use.

  • Building / Construction / Home Maintenance: Buildings, building materials; construction practices, such as cost estimators, standards and codes; construction with specific materials; carpentry; roofing; plumbing; heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC); painting. Collection is oriented to amateurs, but serves the professional as well.
  • Chemical Industries: Fundamentals of biotechnology, chemical technology and manufacture of industrial chemicals, fuels, fireworks, beverage and food science, oils (including petroleum), fats, waxes, plastics, gases, ceramics, glass, and various organic products; popular titles on wine, beer and other beverages; fabric dyes and home soap-making.
  • Computers: Software, operating systems, programming, databases, word processing, spreadsheets, productivity suites, Web and computer graphics and multimedia systems. (Related topics such as hardware repair, computer-aided design and some software applications are found under electronics, engineering and business, respectively.)
  • Consumer: Buying guides and magazines as well as consumer advice and education in areas such as autos, electronics, insurance, healthcare, home, personal finance and business.
  • Cooking: Cooking classics and histories; general, ethnic, diet-based, seasonal and holiday cookbooks; current culinary culture and trends such as butchering, canning, food design, pickling and preserving; beverages; catering; diets; entertaining; gracious living; household hints and crafts; lists of cooking schools; starting a food-related business.
  • Furniture-Making / Manufactured Products: Beginning and advanced woodworking, cabinetry and furniture-making with emphasis on  plans, tool usage and techniques; precision instruments such as clocks and watches, typewriters and firearms; hardware and household appliances; some clothing and accessories; printing, paper making and bookbinding; welding and blacksmithing; packaging technology and other manufactured products; repair manuals as well as handbooks of various collectibles – toys, dolls, teddy bears and other manufactured items.
  • Gardening / Agriculture / Pets: Agriculture and related technologies; specific techniques, apparatus, equipment and materials; plant injuries, diseases and pests; field and plantation crops; orchards, fruits and forestry; garden crops and vegetables; animal husbandry; dairy processing and related products; bees and beekeeping; pet care; hunting, fishing and conservation.
  • General Technology: History of technology and inventions; drafting, blueprint reading and engineering graphics.
  • Home Buying and Remodeling: House buying and selling, mortgages, home ownership, general maintenance, repair and specific remodeling; home heating, air conditioning and alternative energy solutions for the home.
  • Household Management: Sewing; grooming; retirement planning; restaurant guides; restaurant and hotel management; housekeeping; parenting and eldercare.
  • Manufacturing: Manufacturing and manufacturing processes; metalworking processes, including welding; ferrous and nonferrous metals; lumber processing; wood products; pulp and paper technology; leather and fur processing; textiles and other products of specific kinds of materials such as tobacco and rubber.

Medicine/ Health

This general medicine and health collection emphasizes current and accurate information and is primarily for patients, their families and caregivers. Nursing students, home health aides and other practitioners use the collection to assist them in licensing exams and for practical advice in their work. This is a support collection that is weeded based on significance of title and changing use.

  • General Health and Medicine: Encyclopedias, dictionaries, histories of medical science; general works on health and medical practices; practice exams for admission tests for medical and nursing schools, practice exams for nurses at all levels.
  • Human Anatomy and Physiology: Illustrated anatomy and physiology guides; human gene mapping (genome project); human experiments in medicine.
  • Promotion of Health: Addiction, mental health, exercise manuals, weight loss, body changes, nutrition, obesity, special diets, celebrity authors and trainers, health spas, hygiene, longevity, pain treatments, diseases, sex education, self-defense, wilderness survival.
  • Prevention and Safety: First aid, food safety, home safety and sanitation, air pollution, environmental contamination, hazardous waste, epidemics; fire codes and prevention; history of infectious diseases.
  • Pharmacology and Therapeutics: Pharmacology, recreational drugs, medicinal plants, antidepressants, drug side effects, toxicology, acupuncture, complementary and alternative treatments and remedies, lead prevention, therapeutic use of pets, body, mind and exercise therapy.
  • Diseases: All physiological and psychological diseases, symptoms and treatments, for instance AIDS, allergies, Alzheimer’s, arthritis, cancer, cerebrovascular diseases, anorexia and bulimia, depression, diabetes, dementia, obesity, phobias, speech pathology and strokes.
  • Surgery: Anesthesia; plastic, orthopedic, cancer and eye surgery; dental care.
  • Obstetrics, Gynecology and Childhood Diseases: Female reproductive system, pregnancy, birth, postpartum care, menopause; baby care, childhood diseases and disabilities.
  • Disabilities: Medical aspects of living with disabilities including blindness, vision impairment, deafness and hearing impairment, mobility, mental illness, autism spectrum disorders; guides for those living with disabilities; guides for caregivers of people with disabilities.

Engineering

This collection includes works on engineering, energy, transportation and communication, including modes that enable communication to take place (e.g. the postal system). General readers, students, hobbyists, do-it-yourselfers, apprentices, and professionals use this collection to gain general knowledge. The extensive collection of approximately 2,000 automobile, truck and motorcycle repair manuals covers more than 30,000 individual models. This is a support collection that is weeded based on significance of title and changing use.

  • Conservation and Energy Resources: Natural resources, subsurface resources, energy; conservation issues; wildlife.
  • Engineering: Basic engineering, tools, and equipment; civil engineering, excavation, construction, and structures; hydraulics; municipal and environmental engineering; mining and related operations; aircraft, rail equipment, trolleys, roads, automobiles, motorcycles, bicycles, spacecraft; military and nautical engineering; military weapons; vehicles, ships and airplanes; boats and ships both pleasure and commercial; space; home wiring; audio systems; electronics and electronic fundamentals; solar energy; computer and television repair; robotics.
  • Postal Service, Communications and Transportation: Stamp catalogs, collecting and post office histories; telecommunications and the film, radio and television industries; histories of transportation and transportation systems and industries in the air, water and on land; specific vehicles and equipment.

Business / Economics

Works on business, economics and the job market meet the needs of students, employees, business owners and entrepreneurs, consumers, job seekers and career changers. The economics collection in particular is geared toward consumers, students through the undergraduate level, do-it-yourself personal investors, financial planners and people interested in labor history and practices. The collection is supplemented by offerings in the Small Business Center and the Jobs & Careers Center. This is a support collection that is weeded based on significance of title and changing use.

  • General Business: Business and financial success.
  • Office Management: Business letters and secretarial handbooks; word processing and data processing.
  • Advertising: Direct, outdoor and media advertising; trade shows; history of advertising.
  • Marketing: Marketing for small business; sales management and planning; market and consumer research; distribution channels.
  • Managing: Human resource management; leadership; business ethics; general management techniques.
  • Accounting: Bookkeeping, financial reporting, cost accounting and auditing; nonprofit, government and small business accounting.
  • Insurance: Insurance for consumers and – to some degree – professionals; evaluation and ranking of insurers, private and governmental insurance.
  • Commerce and International Trade: History of trade; interstate and Internet commerce; retail trade; companies; shopping; consumer studies; international import-export and guides to doing business internationally; current and historical trade topics such as globalization, international trade relations and slavery.
  • Small Business: Choosing, starting, financing and managing various types of small businesses.
     

Economics: Economic theory, political economy, economic history of all countries of the world with an emphasis on the U.S.

  • Economic systems: socialism; communism; anarchism; utopian communities
  • Labor: history of the labor movement; directories of labor organizations; manuals on grievance processing and negotiations
  • Investing: investment manuals, advice, newsletters; technical analysis; directories of investment companies
  • Personal finance: do-it-yourself financial planning
  • Industries: company histories; analysis of industrial development; industry overviews; directories
  • Taxation: taxation policies

Jobs and Careers: Career exploration, self-assessment, industry and job descriptions, job search, resumes, cover letters, interviews, salary negotiations, and networking; preparations for civil service examinations (e.g. firefighter, post office worker, general); vocational skills

Jobs & Careers Center

The BankAmerica Foundation Jobs & Career Center’s reference and circulating collection offers a centralized starting point for job seekers, students, career changers, employees and business owners looking for materials on career exploration (assessment tools; internships; apprenticeship programs; career analyses), job search resources (resume writing; cover letter writing; interviewing; networking; salary information) and professional business practices (management; skills development; work life). This is a support collection that is weeded based on significance of title and changing use.

Small Business Center

The Small Business Center’s reference and circulating collection offers a centralized starting point for small business owners and prospective entrepreneurs looking for materials on business start-up,  business plans (examples to help users tailor their own plans), financing (how to obtain loans or investor funding), accounting (overviews and introductions for the business owners who do their own accounting or want to understand the processes), marketing (how-to marketing and market research guides; low-cost marketing ideas; market demographics) and operations and management (business law; human resources; leasing; e-commerce; franchising). This is a support collection that is weeded based on significance of title and changing use.

Art, Music & Recreation Center

The Bernard Osher Foundation Art, Music & Recreation Center encompasses the following collections:

  • Visual Arts
  • Music
  • Performing Arts
  • Sports / Recreation

Visual Arts

This collection includes all aspects of the visual arts including painting, drawing, sculpture, print-making, photography, architecture, and performance art.  This area also contains materials on antiques and collectibles, cartoons, interior decoration, landscaping and home plans, crafts, costume and personal adornment. The collection includes biographical, historical, instructional, critical and technical works and in-depth resources such as exhibit catalogs, catalogues raisonnés, collected sets of criticism and subject encyclopedias.  Great emphasis is given to material that documents the San Francisco Bay Area’s artistic life.

In an effort to document the vibrant arts community of the Bay Area, the Library collects reviews, articles and gallery notices of local artists and art shows from the 1930s to the present. Also collected are 19th century engravings and posters announcing local arts events. Users of the collection include general readers, students, researchers and professionals.

This is primarily a resource collection that is weeded based on significance of title, changing use and maintaining existing collection strengths.

  • Architecture: Civic and landscape architecture of all schools, styles, periods and countries.
  • Art History and Appreciation: Encyclopedias; aesthetics, theory and criticism; international art auction sales records and museum collections’ catalogs.
  • Cartooning and Graphic Arts: History, technique and artists of comic, graphic and book arts, illuminated manuscripts, illustration and clip art.  Graphic novels are included in the Library’s Children’s, Teen and Fiction and Browsing Collections.
  • Collectibles: Current and historical price guides, identification guides, and auction house sales records.
  • Costume / Fashion Design: Historical, social and psychological aspects of popular and ethnic costume and designers; high fashion, street fashion, adornment, tattooing and body piercing.
  • Crafts: Contemporary and historical crafts movements and persons; pictorial works on craft collections.
  • Decorative Arts: Industrial art and design; handicrafts; pure and applied design and decoration; calligraphy; decorative coloring; ceramics; metal and other decorative arts in all media, styles, periods and countries.
  • Interiors and Interior Decoration: History, works by and about designers, decorative treatments and styles.
  • Prints: History and reproductions of etchings, engravings, lithography, wood cuts and screen-printing, and biographical information about printmakers.  Related material includes clip-art and the Etching and Engraving Picture File, a special collection of public-domain images from the 19th century indexed by subject.
  • Painting: Books and exhibit catalogs of painters and paintings in all styles, periods and countries.
  • Photography: History, works by and about photographers and on specific theme.
  • Sculpture: History and technique of three-dimensional works in all media, styles, periods and countries.  This includes works about coins, medals, seals, ceramics, glass, tableware, tiles and mosaics, jewelry and origami.
  • Technique and Instruction: Projects and how-to guides to painting, drawing, sculpture, photography including the operation of still and video cameras and their related software, printmaking, fiber crafts and jewelry making, interior decoration.

Music

This collection includes the literature of music (biographies, histories and studies of musical works, genres and styles, music reading and music theory, lists of repertoire, discographies, etc.), scores and printed music, and phonodisc (12” long-playing recordings).  The music literature collection includes books about all nations and time periods.  There are books that provide vocational guidance and information about the music business, as wells as books for the amateur musicians and music-lover.  Special attention is given to collecting literature that documents San Francisco Bay Area music and musicians.

There are collections of scrapbooks, programs, finding aids and newspaper clippings that document San Francisco’s musical life.  The Art, Music and Recreation Center also includes archival collections like the Alfred Hertz papers, the Campion Society Papers, Musicians’ Letters: An Autograph Collection, the Walt Roesner / Fox Theater Orchestra parts, and the William J. McCoy papers.

The score collection is international in scope and includes works of opera and musical theatre, sacred song, secular song including art song, folksong and popular music, full and study scores of orchestral works, chamber music with parts for a wide variety of instrumental combinations, jazz scores and fake book, instruction material and solo repertoire for classical, popular, jazz and international instrumentalists.  Works by San Francisco Bay Area composers and songwriters are also collected in depth.

The Art, Music and Recreation Center also has a reference collection of nearly 200 sets of collected works of classical composers and over 800 sets of orchestral parts loaned out to music organizations.

A special focus of the collection is vocal music for the professional and amateur.  The library has an indexed collection of more than 250 volumes of bound sheet HP (“Hit Parade”) music with more than 9,000 songs, as well as more than 250 fake books or lead sheets with more than 55,000 songs.  The Dorothy Starr Collection has more than 300,000 scores and pieces of sheet music from the 18th through the 20th century established from the stock of Dorothy Starr’s store, The Music Stand.  More than 40,000 items of vocal sheet music have been cataloged into the Dorothy Starr Collection catalog.  This is a semi-archival collection that catalogs multiple editions of works differentiated by imprint, performance medium, and cover picture.

This is primarily a resource collection that is weeded based on significance of title, changing use and maintaining existing collection strengths

Performing Arts

This collection includes all forms of public performance including music, theatre, comedy, film, dance, circus and variety acts, etc.  It includes biographical, historical, critical and technical works and in-depth resources such as collected sets of reviews, criticism and subject encyclopedias. In an effort to document the vibrant performing arts community of the San Francisco Bay Area, the Library collects programs, reviews, articles and ephemera related to local performances from the 1850s to the present. Also collected are posters announcing local performances from the 1960s to the present.  Audio and visual performances in these media are available in streaming e-formats or through the Library’s Audio-visual collections.  Users of the collection include general readers, students, researchers and professionals.

This is primarily a resource collection that is weeded based on significance of title, usage and maintaining existing collection strengths.

  • Dance: General works of all forms of dance including ballet, jazz, modern, social, and ethnic.  This collection includes history, commentary, biography, instruction, and career guidance.
  • Film and Filmmaking: Works about domestic and international feature, documentary and instructional films; producing and financing videos and motion pictures; directing; screenplays; film criticism; popular histories and encyclopedic works.
  • Outdoor Amusements: Works on the circus, rodeo and bullfighting.
  • Radio and Television: General histories, specific program histories and scripts.
  • Theatrical Production and Performance: Dramatic works, Butoh, mime, improvisation, comedy, pantomime and performance art; repertory and regional theater; commentary and reviews; pictorial works; costume design, stage design, props, sets and makeup; theatrical training, education and careers; scrapbooks, performance programs, playbills and posters.

Sports / Recreation

This collection offers materials on games and puzzles, group games, outdoor recreation and sports which reflect local recreational interests, plus a file of newspaper articles and ephemera on local sports and recreation from the late 1960s to the present, announcing local sporting events from the 1970s to the present.          

The collection provides historical studies, popular works, biographies and instructional material as well as encyclopedias, books of records, statistics and rules. Users of this collection include the general reader, athletes, coaches, sports fans and outdoors enthusiasts. This is a support collection that is weeded based on significance of title and changing use.

Government Information Center 

The Government Information Center (GIC) supports the following subject areas:

  • Political Science / Law / Federal, State, and Local Documents / Patents and Trademarks
  • The Environmental Center
  • The DIGI Center

Political Science / Law / Federal, State, and Local Documents / Patents and Trademarks

The collection is constructed to meet current desires as well as the needs of researchers in the future. Users of the GIC collection include students, general readers, independent scholars, law firms, law students, and community and political activists. The department strives to maintain fair and balanced collection development policies in the areas described below.

The Government Information Center encompasses the following collections and locations:

  • Political Science. Current and popular titles meet the demands of a politically active community.  Includes political theory, dictionaries, political parties of the United States, foreign governments and their political systems, election systems, directories of lobbyists, and political action committees (PACs).  Subject areas of significant local interest are retained historically. This is a support collection that is weeded based on significance of title and changing use.
  • Law. Consumers will find current self-help publications (Nolo Press and West Publishing), biographies, San Francisco, California, and Federal laws and statutes. Case law, with the exception of U.S. Reports (Supreme Court decisions), is not part of the collection. Case law may be found nearby at the San Francisco Law Library.  The collection supports legislative history research at the federal, state, and local levels.  This is a support collection that is weeded based on significance of title and changing use aw students and community and political activists.
  • Federal, State, and Local Documents.  GIC has maintained federal depository status since 1889. Federal depository materials include statutes, regulations; treaties, census publications, and documents from numerous federal agencies. Date range from 1817 to present. Materials may be in print, CD-ROM, or PURL formats.  As a federal and state depository, San Francisco Public Library adheres to the collection and retention policies set forth by the Federal Depository Library, and the State of California, respectively.  The Library holds non-circulating significant, current and retrospective works in designated city, state and federal depository collections.  This is a comprehensive collection that is rarely weeded (the exception being Bay Area Regional Documents).

 

As a State of California depository, receipt and maintenance of state documents began around 1945 and continues, although the collection dates back to 1850. Includes planning and environmental reports, statistical and consumer publications, legislative indexes, Senate and Assembly histories and Journals, permanent retention of statutes. 

Comprehensive coverage of San Francisco documents started during the 1960s, although many documents precede that date. The collection houses agencies’ annual reports, agendas and minutes of commissions, ordinances and resolutions of the Board of Supervisors since 1967, City budgets, and other publications.

Other non-depository collections include Bay Area Regional documents. Local organizations such as Association of Bay Area Government, Bay Area Air Quality Management District Golden Gate Bridge Highway and Transportation District, and the Bay Area Rapid Transit District.

As part of the Patent and Trademark Resource Center program, the department has access to complete patents from 1790 to the present, indexes to historical patents and trademarks, and related publications. Plant patents are received in print form and are available for viewing. Collection development in this area has mostly ceased as materials have been formatted for online consideration. Some supporting materials for patent and trademark research are held.

The Environmental Center

The Wallace Stegner Environmental Center is named after the Pulitzer Prize-winning author. The collection contains literature concerned with core environmental issues, including but not limited to: the understanding of environmental systems, natural resources, biodiversity, sustainability, environmental movements, conservation strategies, environmental innovation, consumer awareness, “green” business techniques, local resources, political activism, environmental decision making and public policy, hazardous waste handling, waste management

and pollution. The collection is closely linked to the Library's collection of federal, state and local government documents. The Center's collection is geared towards the interested layperson, consumers, environmentalists, students and scholars.  This is a basic collection that is weeded continuously based on use.

The DIGI Center

In 2007, SFPL began digitizing print materials in partnership with Internet Archive. Over the years the program expanded with various grants and funding sources. To bring awareness and to provide learning opportunities for the public, in 2014 the Digi Center – The Digital Imaging Garage and Innovation Center -- was created in the former Patent and Trademark Center. Within this setting, the Digi Center has digitized over 4,000 items with over 1 million downloads of those items. Collection development policies for the Digi Center follow the guidelines of the SFPL Collection Development Plan, but with special considerations given to showcasing online materials. Materials that are digitized are those with local historical significance, unique to San Francisco or the Bay Area, relevant to the collection as a whole, asserts a major place in history, and useful for generations to come.

Magazines & Newspapers Center

The Herb Caen Magazines & Newspapers Center holds thousands of current and historical magazines, newspapers, phone books and San Francisco city directories. The wealth of

information found in this collection of popular periodicals and scholarly journals – which supplements and enhances all the subject areas found in the library – is used by the general public, students, researchers and genealogists. This is a resource collection that is weeded based on significance of title, usage and maintaining existing collection strengths.

  • Magazines: More than 8,500 titles of which over 1,800 are current subscriptions, some dating to the 18th century; back issues of popular magazines and trade and scholarly journals.
  • Current Newspapers: More than 50 English-language newspapers from San Francisco, the San Francisco Bay Area, California, major U.S. cities.
  • San Francisco Newspapers on Microfilm: Archival collection of San Francisco newspapers on microfilm from the mid-1800s to the present.
  • Other Newspapers on Microfilm: Past years of The New York TimesLos Angeles Times, The Times (London) and other major national newspapers.
  • San Francisco City Directories: From 1850 to 1982.
  • San Francisco Phone Directories: From 1899 to the present.
  • National and International Phone Directories: Current collection representing various countries and selected cities in all 50 states, with a focus on the Bay Area and California.    
  • Criss+Cross (Reverse) Directories: Haines directories for San Francisco (1976 to the present) and San Mateo County (1977 to the present); current street address telephone directories for Marin County and Oakland.
  • Periodicals: The Main Library’s diverse and comprehensive collection of periodicals – current and historical magazines, newspapers and journals – reflects all the subject areas in which the library collects. Decisions about selection and retention of periodicals, while similar to decisions made for the collection at large, are unique in great part due to the open-ended nature of periodicals versus monographs; the options that may exist for acquiring electronic versions of periodicals; binding considerations; and the limits of shelf space. Therefore, before the Library enters into the long-term commitment of resources required by the acquisition of a new periodical title (compared with the acquisition of a monograph or even a multi-volume set such as an encyclopedia), a different but equally-important set of considerations must be reviewed.

Most titles collected in English are accessible through the Magazines & Newspapers Center; titles in international languages are accessible through the International Center. Refer to the online catalog for specific periodicals the Library owns and where they can be found.

Suggestions from the public for titles to which the Library does not currently subscribe are welcome. The Library does not accept gifts or donations of subscriptions or individual issues of periodicals (see Gifts of Money and Materials).

Selection Criteria

In keeping with the Library’s Mission Statement and the Collection Development Policy, the following criteria must be considered when evaluating periodicals in print (see criteria for considering electronic resources):

  • All criteria used for the collection at large, plus:
  • Indexed in print or online sources subscribed to by San Francisco Public Library
  • Complete run from issue #1
  • Local interest
  • Popular interest
  • International language interest
  • Language is read by a significant number of San Franciscans
  • Availability online as full text
  • Reviewed in professional and popular media

Retention Criteria

Retention of periodicals must be considered in terms of the following criteria:

  • Indexed in print or online sources subscribed to by San Francisco Public Library
  • Complete run from issue #1
  • Enduring interest vs. having only current interest
  • Availability online as full text
  • Relationship to the existing collection
  • Retention history of same periodical under previous title(s)
  • Language (languages other than English are typically not retained)

The Bridge at Main (Community, Programs & Partnerships)

The Bridge at Main is a literacy and learning center that prioritizes community learning, adult literacy, youth and family literacy and technology literacy to create a learning environment for 21st Century skills.  It includes three collections:

  • Bridge Collection
  • Hi-Lo Collection
  • Veterans Resources Collection

 

Bridge Collection

This collection provides materials that support learning and literacy, including:  adult learning, English as a Second Language, learning differences, autism spectrum disorders, intellectual and developmental disabilities. The collection is intended for use by individuals, their parents, families and friends, as well as professionals and educators. It includes instructional resources and workbooks to aid in the teaching of basic reading and writing skills and also resources on various subjects that affect student learning. Included are books about learning differences for children and teens; Spanish language materials; and materials in audio and video formats. Materials range from introductory overviews to specialized books and reference works, along with journals and newsletters from organizations and associations with an interest in learning and instruction. This is a resource collection that is weeded based on significance of title, usage and maintaining existing collection strengths. Subject areas include:

Education and Educational Theory: Learning theory, learning styles and multi-sensory instruction for use by teachers and tutors. Special education, Individualized Education Programs (IEPs), mainstream teaching, home schooling, classroom management, teaching strategies, learning strategies, inclusion, finding the right school, phonics, speech and language.

GED Test Preparation: For individuals taking the test for the high-school equivalency General Education Diploma.

English as Second Language: Basic reading, writing, grammar, vocabulary and comprehension for English language learners.

Adult Literacy Instructional Resources: Basic reading, writing, grammar and comprehension skills for use by teachers and tutors working with English-speaking adults.

Learning Differences: Learning disabilities, auditory processing, dyslexia and reading problems, dyscalculia, dysgraphia, auditory and visual processing, sensory integration, nonverbal learning disabilities, social cognition, attention deficit disorder, gifted students and speech and language disorders.

Parenting, Discipline, Behavior and Self-Esteem: Homework strategies, organization strategies, advocacy, nurturing resilience, motivation and fostering self-esteem, behavior problems, discipline solutions and anger management.

Hi Lo Collection

This collection is designed to provide recreational reading material to adult readers seeking high interest content with written at a lower reading level this includes volunteer tutors and adult learners in the adult literacy program, Project Read, emerging readers, and English language learners. This is a basic collection that is weeded continuously based on use.

Recreational Reading Materials: Fiction, literature, social sciences, mathematics, sports, medicine and government, and other subjects of interest to adult learners written at appropriate levels. 

Veterans Collection

This collection is intended to Support the Veterans Connect at the Library program. The special focus of this project is to provide information to reintegrate California veterans into the California workforce and our communities in order to provide veterans the quality of life of other Americans. Resources are for veterans and their families to learn about state and federal education, employment, housing, health, disability and other benefits that may be available to them. This is a basic collection that is weeded continuously based on use.

  • State and Federal Programs: Education, employment, housing, health disability, and other benefits.
  • Personal Enrichment: Employment, military to civilian transition, family and relationships, physical and mental health.

San Francisco History Center

The Daniel E. Koshland San Francisco History Center contains a comprehensive, non-circulating research collection of materials covering all aspects of San Francisco, and, to a lesser extent, the San Francisco Bay Area, California and the West, from its earliest days to the present. The Center contains both primary and secondary materials in all formats, including books, manuscript and archival collections, newspapers, ephemera, photographs, slides, films and videos in VHS and DVD format, posters and broadsides, CDs and CD-ROMs, maps, architectural plans and drawings, scrapbooks, diaries and journals, oral histories and selected artifacts. Rare San Francisco newspapers – including neighborhood newspapers, international language newspapers and early city newspapers – are also part of the collection. Popular and scholarly periodicals with a focus on San Francisco reside here, too. The Center’s collection serves a wide range of patrons, from students to scholars to the general public. The Center acquires all available current and retrospective works and retains all titles and holdings, with an emphasis on long-term preservation. This is a comprehensive collection where weeding rarely occurs, except for condition and the addition of superior replacement copies.

  • San Francisco Historical Photograph Collection: San Francisco topics represented in more than 250,000 photographs, negatives, photo albums, slides, postcards and other works on paper, including line drawings and paintings; more than 38,000 digital images; the San Francisco News-Call Bulletin’s photo morgue of more than 1,000,000 photographs of San Francisco and beyond.
  • Official Archives for the City and County of San Francisco: Historical records of San Francisco’s departments and mayors in a variety of formats, including 19th and 20th century ledgers, blueprints, photographs, audiovisual materials and paper; departments represented include Police, Fire, Civil Service, Medical Examiner, Unified School District, Planning, Public Works and the Arts Commission.
  • Local history: Historical records of San Francisco organizations, businesses, neighborhoods and ethnic communities documenting the social, political and business history of the city.
  • San Francisco Public Library: Archives of the San Francisco Public Library, including the minutes from Library Commission meetings.

Book Arts & Special Collections

The Marjorie G. and Carl W. Book Arts and Special Collections Center houses the following research collections: Robert Grabhorn Collection on the History of Printing and the Development of the Book; Richard Harrison Collection of Calligraphy and Lettering; Schmulowitz Collection of Wit & Humor and the Little Maga/Zine Collection. Holdings also include early children's books; Sherlockiana; materials by and about Robert Frost; works by and about writers associated with the literary life of San Francisco and materials documenting the Panama Canal and its effect on the West Coast. These non-circulating research collections serve bibliophiles, calligraphers, printers and bookbinders, artists, teachers and students, humorists, scholars and the general public. The Center contains primary and secondary materials in a wide variety of formats, including books, periodicals, newspapers, broadsides, ephemera, audiovisual materials and electronic resources. The Center acquires current and retrospective titles, and retains all titles and holdings with an emphasis on long-term preservation and conservation. This is a comprehensive collection where weeding rarely occurs, except for condition and the addition of superior replacement copies.

  • Robert Grabhorn Collection on the History of Printing and the Development of the Book: More than 10,000 volumes, 100 journal titles, and 35,000 items of ephemera, artifacts, documentaries  and materials in electronic formats supporting the study of printing, papermaking, bookbinding, typography, design and other areas of the traditional book arts; examples of almost every typeface, printer, and publisher of note from Gutenberg to the present day; early type specimens; the work of 16th century French and Italian masters; works of over 400 fine and private presses; the Max J. Kuhl Collection, the Jane Hart Collection on Book Design, and the Wilder Bentley/Archetype Press collection.
  • Richard Harrison Collection of Calligraphy and Lettering: More than 900 titles supporting the study and practice of historical and contemporary calligraphy, and more than 1,000 examples of modern calligraphy, including original manuscripts, broadsides, handwritten books, fine prints, limited edition books, drawings, working layouts and photographs; medieval through 17th century manuscript leaves and books and a selection of writing books, both in original and facsimile. Predominantly from the 20th century, the collection provides examples of the work of over 150 individual scribes and lettering artists from the United States and Europe.  Collection includes a selection of periodicals, journals from calligraphy societies around the world, videos in VHS and DVD format, and the Lili Cassel Wronker Archive.
  • Schmulowitz Collection of Wit & Humor (SCOWAH): More than 21,000 volumes and 230 periodical titles in 35 languages, plus sound recordings and ephemera, spanning 400 years of wit and humor as represented in fairy tales, folklore, proverbs, national and ethnic humor, anecdotes, joke books, cartoon art, comic books, political satire, biography, humorous essays, monologues, plays, novels, popular entertainments, movable books, and humor studies. Works of The New Yorker and Punch writers and artists; full run of Punch (1841-2002); the personal archive of Nat Schmulowitz. This collection also includes the Debenham Comedy Recording Collection (over 17,000 recordings in these formats: 45s, 78s, LPS, CDs; cassettes) and the Deex Repository of Lyrical Limericks Collection (DROLL) includes more than 1,300 books, periodicals, recordings, and ephemera.
  • Little Maga/Zine Collection: Documents the Little Magazine and Zine movements of the San Francisco Bay Area. More than 1,000 titles of self-published zines, and little magazines representing almost every literary movement from the 1940s to the present; reference books, ephemera, and audiovisual resources supporting the study of the little magazine and zine movements.

Additional collections:

  • George M. Fox Collection of Early Children’s Books: Nineteenth century British and American children's books partially derived from the archives of the American publisher, McLoughlin Brothers (1828-1978). More than 2,000 volumes, particularly strong in early color illustrations, hand-colored, stenciled, block-printed, lithographed, and chromolithographed; small collection of wood blocks.
  • Robert Frost Collection: More than 200 volumes of inscribed first editions, ephemera and manuscript materials by and about the poet Robert Frost, who was born in San Francisco in 1874.
  • Sherlock Holmes: More than 275 volumes relating to Arthur Conan Doyle and Sherlock Holmes; includes biography, criticism, first editions and foreign translations, plus a small periodical collection.
  • Panama Canal Collection: Documents the history and opening of the canal and its dramatic effect on the development of the West Coast; more than 200 volumes plus manuscripts, newspapers, pamphlets, presidential letters, authorizations, confidential reports and ephemera.
  • James D. Phelan California Authors Collection: More than 1,500 volumes by and about writers, playwrights, and poets associated with the literary life of San Francisco, from its beginnings to the present. Includes the Eric Hoffer Collection, the Pete Winslow Archive, and the Fred Goerner Archive.

Branch Library & Bookmobile Collections

San Francisco Public Library branches collect basic materials that meet the needs of the branch community, at adult, teen and children's reading levels. Reference materials such as dictionaries, encyclopedias, atlases, selected editions of important works, and directories and handbooks are available at each branch. Circulating materials include graphic novels, fiction and nonfiction best sellers, classic and literary fiction, popular nonfiction materials such as cookbooks, travel books, and current, general works on a wide range of subjects. Branch libraries also obtain materials to support student curriculum needs on such topics as California missions, science fairs and states. Materials for younger children, such as board books, picture story books, and beginning readers are included in the children’s section of the branch collections. Branches offer a variety of magazines, newspapers and audiovisual materials such as audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Small collections of large print books are also provided. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library's request system, as well as through Link+ or Interlibrary Loan. Most of the Library's large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

Language collections in the branches serve the needs of the bilingual and non-English-speaking communities of San Francisco with basic high interest non-English materials for adults, teens and children. Patrons learning new languages also use these collections. Book collections include current and classic fiction titles written in the native language, as well as translations of English language best sellers. Popular subjects such as cooking, computers, travel and poetry are included. Special emphasis is placed on materials which aid new immigrants in adapting to their new culture: language learning, citizenship information, educational materials, health, psychological support and motivational materials. Children’s materials are collected in multiple languages to enable children to retain their native language as well as learn new languages. Newspapers, periodicals and audiovisual materials are also provided in the native language. Language collections are typically placed in branches when the language population reaches a level of 10% of the community. Language collections are collected at small, medium, and large levels. Small and medium collections are predominately circulating materials. Small collections range from 200 to 1000 volumes. Medium collections contain 1000 to 4000 volumes. Large collections, over 4000 volumes, include several encyclopedias and reference collections. The largest branch language collections are: Chinese at Chinatown Branch; Spanish at Mission Branch; Japanese at Western Addition Branch; and Russian at Richmond Branch. The International Center at the Main Library is a system-wide resource with materials in 40 languages.

Materials of ethnic and community interest are collected in branches with large international language collections, or large representative ethnic or community groups. These collections include circulating and reference materials in English that focus on the countries and cultures of specific language communities and ethnic or community groups. The materials include customs, history, biography, arts and culture of countries of origin, and the experiences of specific ethnic or community groups in the United States. The major Interest Collections are: African-American Interest at Bayview/Linda Brooks-Burton Branch; Chinese Interest at Chinatown Branch; Filipino Interest at Excelsior Branch; LGBT Interest at Eureka Valley/Harvey Milk Memorial Branch; Japanese Interest at Western Addition Branch; and Latino Interest at Mission Branch. The Main Library provides similar collections in the African American Center, Chinese Center, Filipino American Center, and Gay and Lesbian Center.

Many branch libraries keep a file of information that is pertinent to their communities. Neighborhood files may contain clippings from local newspapers and magazines, pamphlets, brochures, photographs and ephemera related to the neighborhood that directly surrounds the branch library. Each branch library collection of neighborhood files varies in size and scope according to the needs of the community and the availability of resources. A research collection covering San Francisco history, including aspects of many neighborhoods, can be found in the San Francisco History Center at the Main Library.

Anza Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Anza Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

http://www.sfpl.org

  • Anza Branch has medium sized collections of Chinese and Russian language materials.

Bayview / Linda Brooks-Burton Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Bayview Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • Bayview / Linda Brooks-Burton Branch also has a collection of materials by and about African Americans. Additional research materials can be found in the African American Center at the Main Library.
  • Bayview / Linda Brooks-Burton Branch has a medium sized collection of Chinese language materials and a small collection of Spanish language materials.

Bernal Heights Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Bernal Heights Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • Bernal Heights Branch has a medium sized collection of Spanish language materials.
  • Bernal Heights Branch has a neighborhood history file.

Bookmobiles/Mobile Outreach

SFPL Mobile Outreach offers a variety of library services and collections beyond San Francisco Public Library’s physical locations, connecting with SF residents where they work, play, create, learn and live regardless of physical, economic, social, and geographic or other barriers.

  • Library bookmobiles visit over 60 locations including Treasure Island, offering a wide variety of basic library materials in multiple formats and languages.

Chinatown Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Chinatown Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • Chinatown Branch has a large Asian Interest collection in English which covers China, Chinese culture and the Chinese in America. Additional research materials are available in the Chinese Center at the Main Library.
  • Chinatown Branch has a large collection of Chinese language materials and a medium sized collection of Vietnamese language materials.
  • Chinatown Branch has a neighborhood history file.

Eureka Valley / Harvey Milk Memorial Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Eureka Valley Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • Eureka Valley / Harvey Milk Memorial Branch has an LGBT Interest collection that includes materials on the culture, history and life experience of the LGBT community: Lesbians, Gay Men, Bisexuals, Transgender, Queer, Questioning, Intersex people and other Sexual Minorities. Additional research materials are available in the James C. Hormel Gay & Lesbian Center at the Main Library.

Excelsior Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Excelsior Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • Excelsior Branch has a medium sized collection of materials by Filipino authors and of Filipino interest in both English and Filipino. Additional research materials are available in the Filipino American Center at the Main Library.  Excelsior has a large collection of Chinese language materials and a large collection of Spanish language materials.
  • Excelsior Branch has a neighborhood history file.

Glen Park Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Glen Park Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • Glen Park Branch has a medium sized collection of Chinese language materials and a small collection of Spanish language materials.

Golden Gate Valley Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Golden Gate Valley Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • Golden Gate Valley Branch has a local neighborhood history file.

Ingleside Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Ingleside Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • Ingleside Branch has a medium sized Chinese language collection.
  • Ingleside Branch has a neighborhood history file.

Marina Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Marina Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • Marina Branch has a small collection of Chinese language materials.

Merced Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Merced Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • Merced Branch has a medium sized collection of Chinese language materials and a small Russian collection.
  • Merced Branch has a neighborhood history file.

Mission Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Mission Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • Mission Branch has a large Latino Interest collection of circulating and reference books which highlight the history and culture of Latin American countries and the history and influence of Latino cultures in the United States. Additional research materials are available in the International Center at the Main Library.
  • Mission Branch has a large Spanish language collection and a medium sized Chinese language collection.
  • Mission Branch has a neighborhood history file
  • Mission Branch has a photographic history archive collected from neighborhood residents as part of the Shades of San Francisco Project.

Mission Bay Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Mission Bay Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • Mission Bay Branch has a medium sized collection of Chinese language materials, a small collection of Russian language materials, and a small collection of Spanish language materials.

Noe Valley / Sally Brunn Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Noe Valley Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and FDVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

North Beach Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, North Beach Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • North Beach Branch has a small collection of information by and about writers from the “beat” era. Additional research materials can be found in the San Francisco History Center in the Main Library.
  • North Beach Branch also has a large Chinese language collection.

Ocean View Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Ocean View Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • Ocean View Branch has a medium sized collection of Chinese language materials.
  • Ocean View Branch has a photographic history archive collected from neighborhood residents as part of the Shades of San Francisco Project.

Ortega Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Ortega Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • Ortega Branch has a medium sized Chinese language collection and a small Russian language collection.

Park Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Park Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • Park Branch has a neighborhood history file.

Parkside Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Parkside Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • Parkside Branch has a large collection of Chinese language materials and a small collection of Russian language materials.

Portola Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Portola Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • Portola Branch has a medium sized collection of Chinese language materials.

Potrero Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Potrero Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • Potrero Branch has a small Chinese language collection.  
  • Potrero Branch houses part of the Potrero Hill Archives Project which was started in 1986 to record oral histories of Potrero Hill residents and gather old photographs of the neighborhood. During the branch renovation, this collection will be available in the San Francisco History Room.

Presidio Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Presidio Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

Richmond / Senator Milton Marks

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Richmond Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • Richmond / Senator Milton Marks Branch has a large collection of Chinese language materials, a large collection of Russian language materials, a small collection of Vietnamese language materials and a small collection of Korean language materials.

Sunset Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Sunset Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • Sunset Branch has a large collection of Chinese language materials,  a medium sized collection of Russian language materials and a small collection of Vietnamese language materials.
  • Sunset Branch has a photographic history archive collected from neighborhood residents as part of the Shades of San Francisco Project.

Visitacion Valley Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Visitacion Valley Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • Visitacion Valley has a medium sized Chinese language collection.

West Portal Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, West Portal Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • West Portal Branch has a large collection of Chinese language materials and a small collection of Russian language materials.

Western Addition Branch

San Francisco Public Library branches collect materials that meet the needs of the branch community. Like all branch libraries, Western Addition Branch offers high interest books at adult, teen and children’s reading levels. Basic collections of fiction, nonfiction and reference materials are available. Branches also offer a variety of magazines, newspapers, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs. Books not collected by a branch may be obtained through the library’s request system, Link+, or interlibrary loan. Most of the library’s large collection of electronic resources is accessible from all branch locations and online 24 hours a day at www.sfpl.org.

  • Western Addition branch has a Japanese interest collection in English and an African American interest collection. Additional research materials are available in the International Center and the African American Center at the Main Library.
  • The Western Addition Branch has a large Japanese language collection and a small Russian language collection.
  • Western Addition Branch has a photographic history archive collected from neighborhood residents as part of the Shades of San Francisco Project.

Electronic Resources Collections

Electronic resources consist of content that is stored and displayed digitally and accessed via computers and other electronic devices. These resources are often referred to as databases, or as online or digital content, resources or media.

The Library collects a variety of electronic resources that may include some or all of the following: full-text magazines, newspapers, journals and other periodicals, reference sources, indexes, abstracts, images, electronic books and electronic media. With the electronic collection the Library aims to extend access to library information, regardless of location. Patrons can access these collections within or beyond the actual, physical facilities of the Library. The electronic format enables increased usability of library resources, allowing expanded searching and interactivity. This format also increases depth and breadth of the collection system-wide, alleviating the need to purchase multiple copies of some print resources.

These collections are used by library staff and patrons in the Main Library and the branches, as well as outside the Library. Some electronic resources are shared with other California library systems. When selecting electronic resources, librarians must consider the following in addition to the selection criteria for the collection at large:

  • Content output options
  • Coverage
  • Ease of use
  • Feedback on database trials
  • Number of simultaneous users
  • Ownership of content
  • Possible impermanence of the technology
  • Relationship of the resource to the print collection
  • Remote access
  • Technical supportability
  • Usage statistics

Because electronic resources are an ever-changing medium, they must be evaluated on an ongoing basis.

Outside Websites

In some cases, the Library may link to outside websites.  SFPL applies comparable standards for linking to outside websites as it does when selecting electronic resources for purchase.  The Library has the right to take down any link at any time without notifying the source.

In addition to the above selection criteria, there are added considerations for outside web sites:

  • Additional charges to patron to use all or parts of the site
  • Availability of content on another selected web site or electronic resource
  • Clear identification of information providers
  • Reliability of information providers
  • Means of contacting author/owner plus method of customer service
  • Accuracy and appropriateness of content
  • Use of pop-up ads
  • Level of commerciality
  • Necessity of extra registration

Collections Digitized from San Francisco Public Library Holdings

In addition to electronic content licensed or purchased from vendors, the San Francisco Public Library digital collection includes materials selected from our collections in order to provide both online access and long-term preservation. The Library digitizes materials in all formats, including books, newspapers, periodicals, photographs, archival and manuscript materials, microforms, and audiovisual media such as tapes and discs. These materials are digitized by either Library staff or vendors and include corresponding cataloging (or metadata) in order to provide public access to them.  Although the Library uses a number of digital formats, the selection and retention process for all of these should be similar.

Selection: Materials are selected for digitizing based on their unique character, relevance to local history and government, popularity with patrons, and copyright restrictions. Preservation of fragile, non-circulating materials is also a concern; digitizing can provide wider access to them while saving the originals from further deterioration.

Retention and weeding: All digitized materials should be viewed as long-term digital assets and preserved in a manner that will ensure their long-term viability and ability to migrate to new formats.

Sharing: The Library should strive to adhere to established metadata standards that will allow for sharing with other institutions in the future, particularly the California Digital Library, where the current California Local History Digital Resources Project sets standards to integrate with their system and all California libraries.

Selection and Maintenance

San Francisco Public Library Collection Levels

1 – Basic Collection – Provides an introductory overview. Includes basic reference materials, such as dictionaries, encyclopedias, selected editions of important works, historical surveys, bibliographies, handbooks and a few major periodicals. Librarians acquire best sellers, other popular materials and a few current, general works on a subject. The collection is weeded continually based on use.

2 – Support Collection – Provides all of Level 1 plus general coverage and understanding of a subject. Encompasses a wide range of representative works including some advanced titles per topic. Librarians acquire reference works, bibliographies and secondary works relating to the particular subject. This is a support collection that is weeded based on significance of title and changing use.

3 – Resource Collection – Provides all of Level 2 plus broad, current, in-depth and retrospective coverage to meet an extensive range of use by public library patrons. Includes the available substantive works on the subject with an emphasis on currency. Librarians acquire all important reference works, a wide selection of specialized books and an extensive collection of journals. The collection is weeded based on significance of title, usage, and maintenance of existing collection strengths.

4Comprehensive Collection – Provides all of Level 3 and encompasses the full range of use for public library patrons, from introductory works for acquiring general knowledge to primary resources for conducting historical research. Librarians acquire all significant and available current and retrospective works for comprehensive coverage of a defined and limited field. All titles and holdings are retained in a non-circulating collection with an emphasis on preservation. Weeding rarely occurs.

LEVEL

 

Current and popular

Classics and significant titles

Retrospective materials if ongoing demand

Retrospective materials for resource level

Comprehensive purchasing and retention

0

Not collected

         

1

Basic

collect

       

2

Support

collect

collect

collect

   

3

Resource

collect

collect

collect

collect

 

4

Comprehensive

collect

collect

collect

collect

collect

 

Responsibility for Selection

Final responsibility and authority for selection rests with the City Librarian or designee, who operates within the framework of the policies adopted by the San Francisco Public Library Commission.

Selection Criteria

In keeping with the Mission Statement and the Collection Development Policy of the San Francisco Public Library, selection criteria include:

  • suitability for meeting the needs of the community
  • appeal to the interests of the community
  • artistic excellence
  • literary merit
  • local interest
  • technical quality
  • quality of presentation
  • reputation and significance of the author, generally and in the local community
  • accuracy
  • authoritativeness
  • objectivity
  • reviews in the professional and popular media
  • originality of thought
  • permanent value
  • popular demand
  • relation to existing collections and other material on the subject
  • inclusion of title in standard or special bibliographies or indexes
  • skill, competence and purpose of the author
  • budget, cost and space considerations
  • contemporary significance and current usefulness
  • suitability of physical form for library use
  • availability of materials at other libraries
  • availability of materials online
  • San Francisco Public Library will only purchase or add to its collection items that conform to U.S. laws (e.g. copyright, trade laws)

Suggestions for Purchase

If you want to suggest a title that the Library does not have, you may suggest books and other library materials and resources by using the online form or by using a paper suggestion form available at all branches and the Main Library. The Library welcomes your suggestions and they are given serious consideration. Because of the volume of suggestions received, staff is unable to notify you about a decision. We encourage you to check the catalog periodically. Link+ or interlibrary loan may be the quickest way to obtain the books you want.

Selection Criteria are used by library staff when evaluating materials for the collections.

Please don’t hesitate to ask for help by contacting a librarian. Librarians may be able to help you find either the exact title that you want or related titles.

Gifts of Money and Materials

San Francisco Public Library accepts gifts of money to enhance library services through the provision of additional materials and services, as well as non-cash gifts of books and other materials. Gifts of money are the management responsibility of the Library's Finance Officer and the Office of the City Librarian. The Office of the City Librarian, in coordination with the Chief of Branches, the Chief of Main, the Chief of Community Programs & Partnerships, and the Chief of Collections & Technical Services, has ultimate responsibility for decisions regarding what gifts will be accepted.

Cash Gifts:

  • For books and other materials for the collection:

This is a gift of cash made specifically for the purpose of buying books and other library materials (e.g., CDs, DVDs, periodicals, etc.) for the collection. Donors may designate the gift for adult materials, children/youth materials or materials in other languages.

  • For library services & program support

This is a gift of cash for general support of library services and programs. The City Librarian will determine the best uses of these funds.

  • While the Library welcomes gifts designating funds for specific audiences or types of materials in the collection, designating funds for specific titles cannot be accommodated.
  • Donors of $500 or more may request that bookplates acknowledging their gifts be affixed to books whose purchase was made possible by their gifts.
  • All gifts of money will be acknowledged.

Non-Cash Gifts

  • Donations are accepted with the understanding that the Library has the right to determine the disposition of gift items. Materials not added to the Library's collections are offered to the Friends of the San Francisco Public Library for their book sales (the proceeds of which are used to fund library programs), or may be shared with other appropriate institutions as part of the Library's Community Redistribution Program.
  • Due to the large volume of gifts received, the Library cannot acknowledge, track or return unsolicited items received from publishers or individuals.
  • Gift materials will be added only if they fall within the guidelines of the SFPL Collection Development Plan and the Library's goals and objectives. San Francisco Public Library applies the same standards of selecting gift materials to be added to its collections as it does when selecting materials for purchase.
  • Examples of materials that may not be added to the collection include those that: are outdated, are in poor physical condition, lack any reviews or are poorly reviewed in professional reviewing sources, or are duplicates of items the Library already owns in sufficient quantity.
  • The Library cannot accept magazine subscriptions purchased by the donor.
  • Prior to accepting a large collection of materials, the donor shall provide the Library with sufficient information about the collection so that the Library may identify resources required for cataloging, processing, preservation and archiving of the materials. The Library shall consider these details for the existing collection as well as the details for its continuation, such as selection and addition of materials and continued funding. In many cases a Deed of Gift and/or a formal written donation agreement may be signed before the library accepts a large collection.
  • The Library is not legally permitted to appraise the value of a non-cash gift. Donors who wish to have an evaluation of their gifts for tax purposes are referred to the IRS Publication 561, Determining the Value of Donated Property, and Publication 526, Charitable Contributions. If the value of a gift exceeds $500, the donor must submit a list giving author, title, place, publisher and date of all items and must complete the current edition of IRS Form 8283, Noncash Charitable Contributions. When the value exceeds $5,000, the donor must obtain an independent appraisal; the donor, appraiser and the Library must all sign IRS Form 8283. The donor pays for the cost of the appraisal, an expense that may be tax deductible. Because the Library is considered an interested party in the transaction, the IRS will not approve an appraisal made by the Library.

Gifts/Donor Disclosure Forms

Friends of the San Francisco Public Library

The Friends of the San Francisco Public Library accepts donations of materials which they sell to raise money for the Library. They will accept most hardcover and paperback books in good condition on all subjects. Donations may be taken to Readers Bookstore at the Main Library, to Readers Bookstore Fort Mason or to the branches. Visit the Friends' Donation Center at 1630 17th Street (between Carolina and Wisconsin streets). They accept donations on Monday - Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Larger donations—10 boxes or more—are eligible for pick up by the Friends Book Donation Van. Call 415-522-8600 for more information. You may also bring small quantities of books to your branch library. Please call your branch ahead of time to let them know you are coming.

Reconsideration of Library Materials

If you have found materials or library resources about which you have concerns, please complete the Request for Reconsideration of Library Materials form to assure prompt, complete consideration by Library staff. After your concerns are reviewed by the Deputy City Librarian and appropriate staff, you will receive a response, generally within four weeks.

Collection Maintenance and Evaluation

Collection maintenance is an ongoing part of the conscientious evaluation of collections by professional librarians and is undertaken with as much care and consistency as the initial selection of materials. Collection maintenance helps to keep the collections current, attractive, responsive, diverse and useful to the needs of the community.

Responsibility

Librarians are responsible for regular evaluation of collections in their branch, unit or selection area. The Collection Development Office  is responsible for replacement and refreshment lists that aid librarians in this evaluation. Main Library subject selectors review their collections for gaps in subject areas and replacement of titles in or out of print as appropriate, based on the criteria below:

Criteria for Collection Evaluation:

  • Accuracy and currency of information
  • Physical condition of materials
  • Availability of newer, more comprehensive or more accessible material
  • Relevance to collection and scope of collection
  • Ease of borrowing materials from another library
  • Relevance to community needs
  • Date of last circulation and number of circulations
  • Number of copies in the collection

Management of Withdrawn Material

When library materials no longer meet the selection criteria for inclusion in the collections the following options are available:

  • Community Redistribution program to public-benefit organizations
  • Offer to other libraries
  • Refer branch last copies to Main Library subject specialists
  • Recycle damaged materials
  • Discard government property in compliance with federal, state and local laws

Materials Budget Allocation and Collection Priorities

Each fiscal year, July 1-June 30, a portion of the Library’s budget is allocated to the purchase and lease of new items. The following narrative describes the sources of funding for the books and materials budget, the budget approval process, the major budget categories and the many factors that determine the Library’s collection priorities.

Sources of Funds

The Library receives annual funding for the purchase of library materials from the City and County of San Francisco’s Library Preservation Fund. Other sources of funds include gifts, grants, and bequests, some of which are received from the Friends of the San Francisco Public Library.

Responsibility for the Books and Materials Budget

Each year the City Librarian presents a proposed Library budget to the Library Commission. The Library Commission then approves a budget proposal which is forwarded to the Mayor. The Mayor presents a budget to the Board of Supervisors, which then approves the Library’s budget, including the amount to be spent on materials. Allocations for the major categories of the materials budget are then determined by senior staff in consultation with division managers, subject to approval by the City Librarian. The selection of materials is coordinated by the Collection Development Office and Main Library staff. .

Major Budget Categories

The major categories of the books and materials budget are books, electronic resources, periodicals (magazines and newspapers), standing orders (annuals, directories, etc.), books and materials in languages other than English, audiovisual materials, and leased books.

Factors That Determine Collection Priorities

Many factors determine the Library’s collection priorities. Among those (not in priority order) are:

  • Usage statistics, such as circulation, in-library use, database use, etc.
  • Public surveys
  • Demand
  • Community assessments
  • Consultations with staff
  • Changing demographics
  • Strategic Plan goals, if applicable
  • Rising costs
  • Recurring costs
  • Restricted grants
  • Library and societal trends
  • Format changes
  • Changes in technology for delivery of content
  • Collection capacity changes

Review and Revision

Comments and suggestions for changes to the San Francisco Public Library Collection Development Plan will be considered first by the Collections Committee, which will review the Plan at least once a year and update it if necessary. Any changes recommended by the committee will be incorporated into the Plan, following approval by the City Librarian.

Comments and suggestions from the public or library staff should be emailed to collections@sfpl.org or mailed to:

Collection Development Plan Review

Collection Development Office

San Francisco Public Library

190-9th Street

San Francisco, CA 94103

Appendix: Branch Language Collections

Language

Branch

Size

 

Language

Branch

Size

Chinese

Marina

small

 

Russian

Merced

small

Chinese

Potrero

small

 

Russian

Mission Bay

small

Chinese

Anza

medium

 

Russian

Ortega

small

Chinese

Bayview

medium

 

Russian

Parkside

small

Chinese

Glen Park

medium

 

Russian

West Portal

small

Chinese

Ingleside

medium

 

Russian

Western Addition

small

Chinese

Merced

medium

 

Russian

Anza

medium

Chinese

Mission

medium

 

Russian

Sunset

medium

Chinese

Mission Bay

medium

 

Russian

Richmond

large

Chinese

Ocean View

medium

       

Chinese

Ortega

medium

 

Spanish

Bayview

small

Chinese

Portola

medium

 

Spanish

Glen Park

small

Chinese

Visitacion Valley

medium

 

Spanish

Mission Bay

small

Chinese

Chinatown

large

 

Spanish

Portola

small

Chinese

Excelsior

large

 

Spanish

Bernal

medium

Chinese

North Beach

large

 

Spanish

Excelsior

large

Chinese

Parkside

large

 

Spanish

Mission

large

Chinese

Richmond

large

       

Chinese

Sunset

large

 

Tagalog (& Filipiniana)

Excelsior

medium

Chinese

West Portal

large

       
       

Vietnamese

Richmond

small

Japanese

Western Addition

large

 

Vietnamese

Sunset

small

       

Vietnamese    

Chinatown

medium

Korean

Richmond

small

       

Key:

 

 Small

200-1000 volumes

Medium

1001-4000 volumes

Large

4001+ volumes

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